Queen Llewellyn Emrys


who-:

Photorealistic pastels of the Maldives by Zaria Forman









libutron:

Tiger Painting | ©Chinese Art Gallery | China Online Museum
Traditional Chinese Painting, painted by Zhang Shanzi (1882-1940).

libutron:

Tiger Painting | ©Chinese Art Gallery | China Online Museum

Traditional Chinese Painting, painted by Zhang Shanzi (1882-1940).




Reblog
28th August at 4:48 am
5,786 notes
"The capacity to be alone is the capacity to love. It may look paradoxical to you, but it’s not. It is an existential truth: only those people who are capable of being alone are capable of love, of sharing, of going into the deepest core of another person—without possessing the other, without becoming dependent on the other, without reducing the other to a thing, and without becoming addicted to the other. They allow the other absolute freedom, because they know that if the other leaves, they will be as happy as they are now. Their happiness cannot be taken by the other, because it is not given by the other.

      — Osho




eartheld:

bvddhist:

Organic ☼ // Spiritual ☯ // Hippie ☮

mostly nature

eartheld:

bvddhist:

Organic ☼ // Spiritual ☯ // Hippie ☮
mostly nature


thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

archiemcphee:

World travelers Jürgen and Mike of For 91 Days recently visited an amazing temple in Setagaya, Tokyo. The Gōtoku-ji temple contains an awesome shrine dedicated to the Maneki-neko, or “Beckoning Cat”, a symbol of good luck and one of Japan’s most iconic images.

Setagaya is the setting of one of the Maneki-neko’s origin stories: It was there long ago that a wealthy feudal lord took shelter during a storm under a tree near Gōtoku-ji temple. “The lord saw the temple priest’s cat beckoning to him and followed; a moment later the tree was struck by lightning. The wealthy man became friends with the poor priest and the temple became prosperous. When the cat died, supposedly the first maneki-neko was made in his honor.”

"Worshipers at the Gotoku-ji often bring a Maneki Neko statue to leave for good luck. The result is a little surreal, with hundreds of cats sitting along a set of shelves outside a shrine. Except in size, they’re are all identical, exactly the same model with the same paw raised and the same beatific expression on their face.

The cat shrine is just one tiny section of the expansive Gotoku-ji temple, which, thanks to its location on the outskirts of the city, is usually very quiet.”

As you can see from these photos, there really are countless ceramic Maneki-neko figurines all over the place. To get an even better sense of just how densely populate the shrine is, check out Jürgen and Mike’s brief video panning across the grounds. There are also many more photos to be seen over at Tokyo For 91 Days.

[via Neatorama and Tokyo For 91 Days]

Oh my gosh

SO MANY BECKONING CATS O.O




Reblog
27th August at 4:48 am
34 notes
Title: In darkness let me dwell, for voice, lute & bass viol (A Musicall Banqu
Artist: Edin Karamazov;Sting
Played: 175 times

evan-wheeler:

In darkness let me dwell; the ground shall sorrow be,
The roof despair, to bar all cheerful light from me;
The walls of marble black, that moist’ned still shall weep;
My music, hellish jarring sounds, to banish friendly sleep.
Thus, wedded to my woes, and bedded in my tomb,
O let me dying live, till death doth come, till death doth come.

In darkness let me dwell




thebeautifulmacabre:

 

the seven deadly sins

w r a t h ;




Reblog
26th August at 2:24 pm
642 notes
"Take one more deep breath, savor it, and plunge forward without thinking. Do not allow yourself hesitation. Do not allow yourself a moment of doubt. Follow your instincts and go where you never would have considered possible.

      — Corey Taylor


foodffs:

Cream Cheese-Filled Banana Bread

Really nice recipes. Every hour.